The Best Sources of Protein For Vegetarians Revealed

If you are a vegetarian and want to know how to complete your proteins intake without any problems. We are here to help you to examines the best sources of protein for vegetarians and also help to keep yourself nourished .


Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

There are a wide variety of plant-rich foods that provide a good source of protein for a vegetarian. Nearly all vegetables, beans, whole grains (such as quinoa, wholegrain bread, brown rice, and barley), nuts and seeds contain a certain amount of protein.

Why do we need protein? 

Protein is made up of smaller units called amino acids and is essential for repairing damaged cells and building new ones. It’s essential in the building of tissues, muscles, and bones, so it’s important to make sure your body has what it needs. 

How much protein do we need a day?

In the UK, adults are advised to eat 0.75g of protein for each kilogram they weigh, based on the Reference Nutrient Intake (RNI). This will vary over your lifetime and depend on your individual circumstance. For example, a more active person, such as an athlete in training, will require more protein than someone living a sedentary lifestyle. 

On average, guidelines suggest men should aim to eat around 55g of protein a day and women should aim for around 45g of protein daily. Read on to discover how you can meet your daily needs.
 

The best veggie protein sources

If you’re cutting out certain food groups such as meat and fish, you might think your protein options are somewhat limited, but there are lots of options for packing in the nutrients. 

Grains and pulses



Lentils, pulses and beans are an excellent storecupboard staple source of protein – 100g of boiled lentils contains around 9g of protein and are a hearty way to bulk up soups, stews and casseroles. Chickpeas, black beans, kidney beans and even baked beans are an easy way to power up your protein intake. 

Dairy products


Dairy products are packed full of calcium and protein, which are both essential as part of a healthy diet – 100g of cow’s milk contains around 3g of protein, while 100g of cheddar cheese contains around 25g of protein. Choose reduced-fat options if you are concerned about saturated fat and calories. Vegan options include nut milks, such as hazelnut or almond milk, but be aware that shop-bought versions contain very low levels of protein. 


Eggs


Eggs are an easily available, cheap source of nutrients. A single hard-boiled egg contains around 7g of protein and makes a nutritious, filling breakfast or lunchtime meal. They’re also easily digestible and low in calories. 


Soya and tofu 


Soy protein is a very versatile ingredient and can be turned into many different delicious forms. Tofu, for example, is made from the curds of soy milk and can be great when bulking out veggie stir-fries or salads. It comes in different forms: silken, firm or extra firm and is another low-calorie, high-protein ingredient you can make use of relatively easily – 100g of firm tofu contains around 8g of protein. 

Nuts and seeds


Nuts and seeds are a handy, snackable form of protein and essential fats. There are certain types that are particularly protein rich: almonds, cashews, chia seeds and flaxseeds are all popular protein options. A 30g portion size of almonds contains around 6g of protein and will see you through the afternoon slump. 

Source : BBC Good Foods

Abhishek

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